OutsideView Educational Series : Enterprise Mode

It is a fairly common perception that, when comparing terminal emulation software, all products are roughly identical. They all talk to the host, right?  They all offer SSL and SSH connectivity, right?  So, how much difference can there be? As it turns out, there is – or can be – quite a bit of difference. OutsideView 8.1 offers a number of unique capabilities. In this article, we will focus on that uniqueness in only one functional area – that of software and user administration. OutsideView offers a group of related options under the name “Enterprise Mode” that has capabilities unmatched by any competing product. Unlimited Installations – In the Enterprise mode, end-user licensing is handled through a dynamic ‘pool.’ Since the number of licenses in the pool defines the number of simultaneous users, there is no limit on the number of instances/locations where the OutsideView software can be installed. Concurrent licensing – With concurrent licensing, an end-use workstation consumes a license only while actively using OutsideView. When OutsideView terminates, the license is released. Now you need purchase only enough licenses to handle your high-water simultaneous usage level, you don’t need a license for every potential user, active or not. Automatic Configuration Synchronization – Administrators can create, or modify, host connection configuration files – in a single central location – and know all end users will automatically acquire those new or changed files upon next OutsideView start. No ‘push’ is needed. Multiple Profiles – Users can be assigned, by Windows User or Group name, to profiles, and each profile can contain a unique blend of user permissions, and configuration files....

OutsideView Educational Series : Multi-Hop SSH Tunneling

Connecting to a host system by routing, or tunneling, through a series of intermediate host connections, is a fairly common scenario in the Unix world.  In the NonStop arena, multi-hop tunneling has not been as commonly available, even though it is just as desirable.    OutsideView 8.1 now offers multiple hop connections, via SSH tunneling.  These indirect connections are easily configured.  OutsideView 8.1 has the ability to route through up to 5 intermediate servers, to reach the preferred final host. Would you like additional information about Dynamic Input Assistance in OutsideView?   The linked video covers how to use and configure this feature to make your Input easier, faster, and more efficient than before. View the video demonstrating Multi-Hop SSH Tunneling: YouTube video Screencast video Download/Play MP4 video Download/Play WMV  video If you have any additional questions, please contact our Sales Engineer, Jim Hampton by email jimh@crystalpoint.com or phone...

OutsideView Educational Series : Dynamic Input Assistance

Dynamic Input Assistance – Common Questions! I am far from being the world’s greatest typist.  I make mistakes.  Is there a better way to correct command line typos than “FC”? I am not a perfect speller, either. Can you get some spell checking, on demand? I often use the same commands time and again. Can my host connectivity software remember those commands for me (even if I shut down and restart my PC)?  AND, let me tweak commands, if I want, when reusing them? Can you give me a smart list of past commands?  I mean, a list of commands based on what I’m doing right now?  Not just dump everything I’ve ever done on me, regardless of its applicability? If I give a command from within one connection, can it be available for any and all my connections?  Immediately and even across separate yet concurrent host sessions? Can I get in-line syntax help when I try to enter infrequent commands? With OutsideView’s Dynamic Input Assistance feature, the answer is YES to all of the above!  OutsideView 8.1 offers all these capabilities through our Dynamic Input Assistance feature. Dynamic Input Assistance is a way to overlay Windows-level technology onto terminal emulation operations.  This can take the form of a text-edit box overlaying a command line so you can do modern entry – insert, overtype, delete, copy, paste, cursor arrows, etc.    Or you can use Command History mode to store commands, and make them instantly, persistently, and globally retrievable across all sessions.  In fact, using the OutsideView context recognition feature (discussed in earlier topics) your retrieved command history is filtered...

OutsideView Educational Series : Dynamic Toolbar Labels

OutsideView 8.1 has the ability to dynamically change toolbar labels to match the work you are doing.  This means you no longer have to remember what the function keys do, in different contexts.   If you are in Tedit, for instance, is it Shift+F3 or Shift+F4 that does a Move?  In ViewSys, is the Cache Hit Rate under F7 or F8?  With OutsideView’s Dynamic Toolbar labels, you no longer need to remember every Function key assignment in every context.  Instead, the toolbar labels change as you do. Here is the dynamic toolbar for Tedit: If you enter ViewSys, your toolbar display automatically changes to reflect function key actions for ViewSys: You can also customize the toolbars labels yourself!  Let’s say you are in SpoolCom, and have have the default toolbar.  Just right-click in it, and select Edit Button List: It is very intuitive to define the toolbar label you want, including what the key ‘content’ is, and the hint or ToolTip display: Would you like additional information about Dynamic Toolbars in OutsideView?   The linked video covers how to use and how to configure it, to make function keys input easier, faster and more efficient than before. View the video covering Dynamic Toolbar: YouTube video Screencast video Download/Play MP4 video Download/Play WMV video If you have any additional questions, please contact our Sales Engineer, Jim Hampton by email jimh@crystalpoint.com or phone 1-425-806-1141....

OutsideView Educational Series : Universal Editor

How do you edit your host application code? Do you use older tools like vi or vim, or Tedit?  Or, do you use multiple, sequential steps such as: 1) download code 2) open code in separate editor 3) edit code 4) save change 5) upload file Neither method sounds like an efficient choice. Crystal Point can offer a better way with OutsideView’s new integrated code editor. With the editor, you can do the following: The new, integrated code editor in OutsideView can make your code editing process much simpler & more productive.  The editor supports multiple code types – including text, multiple NonStop syntaxes such as TAL or TACL Macros, and industry common languages such as C# or C++.   The editor also supports bracket matching, code folding and customizable syntax files. Plus, the code editor includes a monitor function, to keep track of downloaded files, to provide prompts if you make changes without saving them, or have saved changes locally but not uploaded the file back to the host.  The edit monitor will also warn if you are trying to shut down OutsideView while file transfers are underway or if you are leaving edited files before uploading them. Try our new Integrated, color-coded, syntax-aware code editor.  Make coding simpler… Would you like additional information about using the Code Editor features in OutsideView?   We have created two videos with more details. The first covers the basics of Download and Edit, and using the code editor.  The second video covers advanced capabilities such as File Associations within the editor, Syntax Highlighting, Code Folding, Bracket Matching, and customizing Syntax Files. View the...

OutsideView Educational Series : Keyboard Mapper

Did you know you can customize the OutsideView keyboard to work more effectively and productively for yourself or others? Would you like to press one key and get more than one character?  How would you like to press a key and get an entire phrase or command in response? Would you like to map a .NET program or VCB macro to a keystroke combination – so you can invoke it quickly and easily? Would you like to rearrange the keyboard layout to suit yourself, or suit a particular application environment to make more frequently pressed keys more convenient? You can do all those things in OutsideView.  In fact, you can do it in multiple ways.  You make the keyboard changes you want, and that becomes a keyboard map file.  You can create as many keyboard map files as you like.  Then you can tell individual sessions which keyboard map you want them to use.  Maybe you have one keyboard you have ‘tweaked’ for a particular application.  Or maybe you want to use one keyboard map for all your IBM hosts, but a different map when talking to your NonStop.   It’s all up to you – OutsideView lets you choose. Would you like additional information about using the Key Mapper features in OutsideView? View a short video demonstrating how to customize Key Maps to suit your preferences: YouTube video Screencast video Download/Play MP4 video Download/Play WMV  video If you have any additional questions,  please contact our Sales Engineer, Jim Hampton by email jimh@crystalpoint.com or phone 1-425-806-1141    ...

OutsideView Educational Series : .NET Introduction

What is a .NET API, and what can it do for me? An API is an Application Program Interface.  Our .NET API is an interface between OutsideView and any .NET compatible language.    This has huge implications as it means events occurring inside OutsideView – or external to it – can be automated and integrated using the latest object-oriented languages such as C++, C#, etc. OutsideView has always provided a scripting capability, such as our Visual Comm Basic (VCB) macro language, to automate user actions on the workstations.  The .NET API, though, goes far beyond the limitations of VCB.  The .NET API allows full integration of OutsideView with external applications, via object-oriented languages. See .NET Case Study #1  where one early adopter of the .NET interface developed an automation layer that reduced a daily, error-susceptible, manual 3 hour process to an error-free automated process requiring only 10 minutes. What are some of the other events you can do with the .NET API? Integration aids to merge multiple sources of data. High data rate transactions. Productivity aids for things like specialty logins. Wizards for installing software or configuring the NonStop. Data extraction from running legacy applications. .NET custom programming services. Whether you help your users by automating repetitive activity or through sophisticated data manipulations and integrations, the .NET API offers advanced, non-proprietary tools to get the job done. We’ve created a complete tutorial series of 15 videos to help you harness  the power  of our .NET API. The series starts with an introduction:  Introduction: .NET Application Program Interface The entire series of .NET videos is here. If you have any additional...

OutsideView Educational Series : Context Recognition

What is Context Recognition and how can it help me? OutsideView has advanced abilities to assist users while they communicate with their host systems.  These abilities include Identity Management to reduce repetitive or redundant logins, Dynamic Input Assistance to provide command history lists or command syntax assistance, and Dynamic Toolbars providing descriptive labels for your function keys instead of just F1, F2, etc. All of these abilities spring from OutsideView’s ability to recognize your context – that is, the application which you are using.  OutsideView then provides focused assistance, relevant to that specific context.  OutsideView can even be taught to recognize new or custom contexts – so it can assist you when working in your organization-specific environment(s). IDENTITY MANAGEMENT Identity Management has been discussed in another post, which you can access here.  For now, just know that it provides an entirely secure means of retaining, in encrypted memory, your login credentials for automatic re-entry whenever needed.  This can greatly reduce the number of times during your day that you need to type in your various credentials.  OutsideView can only do this by recognizing the contexts where logins are needed. DYNAMIC TOOLBARS Using Context Recognition, OutsideView can display the function key toolbar with dynamically changing labels.  Let’s say you are in TEDIT. OutsideView can show you a toolbar with TEDIT-specific labels: Are you in VIEWSYS?  OutsideView will automatically show you function keys labels appropriate to that context: Do you have a custom application?  Teach OutsideView how to recognize that environment, and you can easily define dynamic toolbar labels for that environment, too. DYNAMIC INPUT ASSISTANCE What was that command you...

OutsideView Educational Series : Session Bar and Thumbnails

The new Microsoft standard application look of tabbed windows (replacing  cascaded or tiled) works very well with OutsideView, letting you tab from session to session to session instantaneously, while continuously seeing a full-size widow.  No more having to enlarge or shrink tiled frames each time you move your focus between sessions. Some folks ask, though, “How do you monitor other sessions if just one session owns the whole viewing area?”  Well, that’s where the OutsideView Session Bar comes in. In earlier topics in this series, we’ve discussed Workspaces, Identity Manager, and cloned sessions.  All these capabilities work in concert with the Session Bar, making it easy to view the session you want in a nice large size – while still keeping an eye on other sessions.  Let’s look at how this all comes together. First, assume a workspace automatically opens multiple sessions in the default Tabbed Windows view. Let’s also assume that you use the Identity Manager, so sessions have “Identity Type” and “Subgroup” attributes. If it’s not already on, turn on View>Session Bar.  Now you see all active sessions listed within the Session Bar.  The listing can be configured via Edit>Application Settings>Session Bar.  By default, though, sessions are listed by name, with their ID type and Subgroup appended. To instantly switch your view from session to session, just click on the tabs along the top, or on the session names in the session bar.  If you want a quick peek at another session, simply hover your mouse over a session name. You’ll receive an accurate pop-up image of that session’s current content.  Scroll your mouse from session to...
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